Greenbiz http://www.deanhau.com/ en Collaborating with the ocean is essential to addressing climate change and environmental justice http://www.deanhau.com/video/collaborating-ocean-essential-addressing-climate-change-and-environmental-justice <span>Collaborating with the ocean is essential to addressing climate change and environmental justice</span> <div class="gbz-video__body"><p>"The potential for the “blue economy” — one that combines more thoughtful stewardship of the ocean’s resources and economic opportunity with a more pragmatic, respectful approach to protecting coastal ecosystems — is vast. But with more than $1.5 trillion in annual economic value linked to ocean-based activities, the time is right to place the world’s seas at the center of a climate-centric post-pandemic recovery. This discussion will center on the role ocean solutions can play in addressing both climate change and systemic environmental justice issues.</p> <p>This session was held at GreenBiz Group’s VERGE 20, October 26-30, 2020. Learn more about the event here: <a dir="auto" rel="nofollow" spellcheck="false" target="_blank">https://events.greenbiz.com/events/ve...</a></p> <p>?</p> <p>Watch our other must-see talks here: <a dir="auto" rel="nofollow" spellcheck="false">https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwW3...</a></p> <p>?</p> <p>OUR LINKS Website: <a dir="auto" rel="nofollow" spellcheck="false" target="_blank">http://www.deanhau.com/</a></p> <p>Twitter: <a dir="auto" rel="nofollow" spellcheck="false" target="_blank">https://twitter.com/greenbiz</a></p> <p>LinkedIn: <a dir="auto" rel="nofollow" spellcheck="false" target="_blank">https://www.linkedin.com/company/gree...</a></p> <p>Instagram: <a dir="auto" rel="nofollow" spellcheck="false" target="_blank">https://www.instagram.com/greenbiz_group</a></p> <p>Facebook: <a dir="auto" rel="nofollow" spellcheck="false" target="_blank">https://www.facebook.com/GreenBiz</a></p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="http://www.deanhau.com/yanni-guo">YanniGuo</a></span> <span>Mon, 11/09/2020 - 17:01</span> <div class="gbz-video__ref"><article> <div class="video-url__field-media-oembed-video"><iframe src="http://www.deanhau.com/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/r8ll81FRGXo&max_width=620&max_height=0&hash=70x3l4qDbZwMZvVhnnjDJKEQ8CEccNvnuPv32CUDqWQ" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="" width="620" height="200" class="media-oembed-content" title="Collaborating with the ocean is essential to addressing climate change and environmental justice"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> <div class="gbz-video__field-featured-video"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Featured </div> <div class="field__item">Off</div> </div> Tue, 10 Nov 2020 01:01:32 +0000 YanniGuo 116755 at http://www.deanhau.com Biden-Harris: The work begins http://www.deanhau.com/article/biden-harris-work-begins <span>Biden-Harris: The work begins</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="http://www.deanhau.com/joel-makower">Joel Makower</a></span> <span>Sat, 11/07/2020 - 10:39</span> <div class="article__body"><p>Whatever your political leanings, the election of Joe Biden as President of the United States increases the odds of bringing America back into the community of nations addressing the climate crisis.</p> <p>“Increases the odds” is the key phrase in the above sentence. There’s a lot of work to do, and not just by our elected representatives, to regain our footing on this issue — and to regain our standing on the global stage.</p> <p>Now, the hard work begins. There is public policy to enact and implement. There are new commitments to be made. There are fractured alliances to mend. But more important, there is leadership to project. Not just by the new president or Congress, but by us all.</p> <p></p><blockquote class="blockquote-large"> <div class="blockquote-large__inner">The new administration will need to know that we have their backs.</div> </blockquote> <p>If America is to be seen as the climate leader so many of us desperately want it to be, we’ll need to stand with Joe Biden and Kamala Harris on climate (and environmental protection in general). We’ll need our voices to be loud and clear. We’ll need to push and prod them toward increasingly more ambitious action.</p> <p>The new administration will need to know that we have their backs.</p> <p>This is easier said than done. Most companies have been woefully silent on climate policy. Despite the explosion of net-zero commitments across the economy, there’s been relatively little hue and cry by business for national leadership on climate issues. Quite the opposite: Most companies have stood by as the current administration dismantled existing climate policies, which must now be pieced back together. It won’t be easy or quick, but nothing less will do. And getting back to where we were in 2016 is only the beginning.</p> <p>Elections are easy; governing is hard, particularly in this fractured age. But it’s heartening that the president-elect’s campaign website has a<a > page</a> dedicated to “a clean energy revolution and environmental justice.” It speaks to how addressing the climate crisis will lead to “a stronger, more resilient nation” as we take on “this grave threat.” It promises that “the development of solutions is an inclusive, community-driven process.”</p> <p>These are words, not deeds, but they nonetheless represent a welcome turnaround from current policy. All of us will need to hold the new administration to account on those lofty aspirations. There will be lots of obstacles overcome, by all of us.</p> <p>More to come on this. For now, it’s time to exhale, relax, savor the moment.</p> <p>But only for a moment. It's a new day. This is when the hard work actually begins.</p> </div> <div class="article__field-gbz-pull-quote"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Pull Quote </div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item">The new administration will need to know that we have their backs.</div> </div> </div> <div class="article__field-topics"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Topics </div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/policy-politics" hreflang="en">Policy & Politics</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/climate-change" hreflang="en">Climate Change</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="article__field-blog-featured"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Featured Column </div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/blogs/featured/two-steps-forward" hreflang="en">Two Steps Forward</a></div> </div> <div class="article__field-featured-in-featured-block"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) </div> <div class="field__item">On</div> </div> <div class="article__field-comments"><drupal-render-placeholder callback="Drupal\disqus\Element\Disqus::displayDisqusComments" arguments="0=Biden-Harris%3A%20The%20work%20begins&1=https%3A//www.deanhau.com/article/biden-harris-work-begins&2=node/116744" token="QSlLpVqprhgLPtcK8XPgoDErofP9aqcL6ke0ls2EnRg"></drupal-render-placeholder></div> <div class="article__field-duration"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Duration </div> <div class="field__item">0</div> </div> <div class="article__field-sponsored"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Sponsored Article </div> <div class="field__item">Off</div> </div> <div class="article__field-featured-image"><figure> <img src="http://www.deanhau.com/sites/default/files/2020-11/biden-harris.jpg" width="950" height="578" alt="biden-harris" /> <div class="media-credit-wrapper"> <figcaption><p>JoeBiden.com</p> </figcaption> </div> </figure> </div> Sat, 07 Nov 2020 18:39:07 +0000 Joel Makower 116744 at http://www.deanhau.com How the climate crisis will crash the economy http://www.deanhau.com/article/how-climate-crisis-will-crash-economy <span>How the climate crisis will crash the economy</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="http://www.deanhau.com/joel-makower">Joel Makower</a></span> <span>Mon, 09/14/2020 - 02:11</span> <div class="article__body"><p>The chickens are coming home to roost.</p> <p>Even before the western United States became a regional inferno, even before the Midwest U.S. became a summertime flood zone, even before an annual hurricane season so bad that the government is running out of names to attach to them, even before Colorado saw a 100 degrees Fahrenheit heatwave swan dive into a 12-inch snowstorm within 48 hours.</p> <p>Even before all that, we’d been watching the real-world risks of climate change looming and growing across the United States and around the world. And the costs, financially and otherwise, are quickly becoming untenable.</p> <p>Lately, a steady march of searing heat, ruinous floods, horrific wildfires, unbreathable air, devastating hurricanes and other climate-related calamities has been traversing our screens and wreaking havoc to national and local budgets. And we’re only at 1C of increased global temperature rise. Just imagine what 2C or 3C or 4C will look like, and how much it will cost.</p> <p>We may not have to wait terribly long to find out.</p> <p>It’s natural to follow the people affected by all this: the local residents, usually in poorer neighborhoods, whose homes and livelihoods are being lost; the farmers and ranchers whose crops and livestock are withering and dying; the stranded travelers and the evacuees seeking shelter amid the chaos. And, of course the heroic responders to all these events, not to mention an entire generation of youth who fear their future is being stolen before their eyes, marching in the streets. So many people and stories.</p> <p>But lately, I’ve been following the money.</p> <p>The financial climate, it seems, has been as unforgiving as the atmospheric one. Some of it has been masked by the pandemic and ensuing recession, but for those paying attention, the indicators are hiding in plain sight. And what we’re seeing now are merely the opening acts of what could be a long-running global financial drama. The economic impact on companies is, to date, uncertain and likely incalculable.</p> <p></p><blockquote class="blockquote-large"> <div class="blockquote-large__inner">The financial climate, it seems, has been as unforgiving as the atmospheric one.</div> </blockquote> <p>Last week, a subcommittee of the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) <a >issued a report</a> addressing climate risks to the U.S. financial system. That it did so is, in itself, remarkable, given the political climes.</p> <p>But the report didn’t pussyfoot around the issues: "Climate change poses a major risk to the stability of the U.S. financial system and to its ability to sustain the American economy," it stated, adding:</p> <blockquote> <p>Climate change is already impacting or is anticipated to impact nearly every facet of the economy, including infrastructure, agriculture, residential and commercial property, as well as human health and labor productivity. Over time, if significant action is not taken to check rising global average temperatures, climate change impacts could impair the productive capacity of the economy and undermine its ability to generate employment, income and opportunity.</p> </blockquote> <p>Among the "complex risks for the U.S. financial system," the authors said, are "disorderly price adjustments in various asset classes, with possible spillovers into different parts of the financial system, as well as potential disruption of the proper functioning of financial markets."</p> <p>In other words: We're heading into uncharted economic territory.</p> <p>Climate change, said the report’s authors, is expected to affect "multiple sectors, geographies and assets in the United States, sometimes simultaneously and within a relatively short timeframe." Those impacts could "disrupt multiple parts of the financial system simultaneously.” For example: "A sudden revision of market perceptions about climate risk could lead to a disorderly repricing of assets, which could in turn have cascading effects on portfolios and balance sheets and therefore systemic implications for financial stability."</p> <h3>Sub-systemic shocks</h3> <p>And then there are “sub-systemic” shocks, more localized climate-related impacts that "can undermine the financial health of community banks, agricultural banks or local insurance markets, leaving small businesses, farmers and households without access to critical financial services." This, said the authors, is particularly damaging in areas that already are underserved by the financial system, which includes low-to-moderate income communities and historically marginalized communities.</p> <p>As always, those least able to least afford the impacts may get hit the hardest.</p> <p>This was hardly the first expression of concern about the potentially devastating economic impacts of climate change on companies, markets, nations and the global economy. For example:</p> <ul> <li>Two years ago, the Fourth National Climate Assessment <a >noted</a> that continued warming "is expected to cause substantial net damage to the U.S. economy throughout this century, especially in the absence of increased adaptation efforts." It placed the price tag at up to 10.5 percent of GDP by 2100.</li> <li>Last month, scientists at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research <a >said</a> that while previous research suggested that a 1C hotter year reduces economic output by about 1 percent, "the new analysis points to output losses of up to three times that much in warm regions."</li> <li>Another <a >report</a> last month, by the Environmental Defense Fund, detailed how the financial impacts of fires, tropical storms, floods, droughts and crop freezes have quadrupled since 1980. "Researchers are only now beginning to anticipate the indirect impacts in the form of lower asset values, weakened future economic growth and uncertainty-induced instability in financial markets," it said.</li> </ul> <p>And if you really want a sleepless night or two, read this story about <a The Biblical Flood That Will Drown California,"</a> published recently in Mother Jones magazine. Even if you don’t have a home, business or operations in the Golden State, your suppliers and customers likely do, not to mention the provenance of the food on your dinner plate.</p> <h3>Down to business</h3> <p>The CTFC report did not overlook the role of companies in all this. It noted that "disclosure by corporations of information on material, climate-related financial risks is an essential building block to ensure that climate risks are measured and managed effectively," enabling enables financial regulators and market participants to better understand climate change’s impacts on financial markets and institutions.</p> <p>However, it warned, "The existing disclosure regime has not resulted in disclosures of a scope, breadth and quality to be sufficiently useful to market participants and regulators."</p> <p>An analysis by the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosure found that large companies are increasingly disclosing some climate-related information, but significant variations remain in the information disclosed by each company, making it difficult for investors and others to fully understand exposure and manage <a href="http://www.deanhau.com/article/what-does-climate-risk-actually-mean">climate risks</a>.</p> <p>The macroeconomic forecasts, however gloomy, likely seem academic inside boardrooms. And while that may be myopic — after all, the nature of the economy could begin to shift dramatically before the current decade is out, roiling customers and markets?— it likely has little to do with profits and productivity over the short time frames within which most companies operate. Nonetheless, companies with a slightly longer view already are considering the viability of their products and services in a warming world.</p> <p>Consider the recommendations of the aforementioned CFTC report, of which there are 20. Among them:</p> <ul> <li>"The United States should establish a price on carbon."</li> <li>"All relevant federal financial regulatory agencies should incorporate climate-related risks into their mandates and develop a strategy for integrating these risks in their work."</li> <li>"Regulators should require listed companies to disclose Scope 1 and 2 emissions. As reliable transition risk metrics and consistent methodologies for Scope 3 emissions are developed, financial regulators should require their disclosure, to the extent they are material."</li> <li>The Financial Stability Oversight Council "should incorporate climate-related financial risks into its existing oversight function, including its annual reports and other reporting to Congress."</li> <li>"Financial supervisors should require bank and nonbank financial firms to address climate-related financial risks through their existing risk management frameworks in a way that is appropriately governed by corporate management."</li> </ul> <p>None of these things is likely to happen until there’s a new legislature and presidential administration in Washington, D.C., but history has shown that many of these can become de facto regulations if enough private-sector and nongovernmental players can adapt and pressure (or incentivize) companies to adopt and hew to the appropriate frameworks.</p> <p></p><blockquote class="blockquote-large"> <div class="blockquote-large__inner">Finally, there is collaboration among the leading nongovernmental organizations focusing on sustainability reporting and accountability.</div> </blockquote> <p>And there’s some news on that front: Last week, five NGOs whose frameworks, standards and platforms guide the majority of sustainability and integrated reporting, announced "a shared vision of what is needed for progress towards comprehensive corporate reporting — and the intent to work together to achieve it."</p> <p><a >CDP</a>, the <a >Climate Disclosure Standards Board</a>, the <a >Global Reporting Initiative</a>, the <a >International Integrated Reporting Council</a> and the <a >Sustainability Accounting Standards Board</a> have co-published a shared vision of the elements necessary for more comprehensive corporate reporting, and a joint statement of intent to drive towards this goal. They say they will work collaboratively with one another and with the International Organization of Securities Commissions, the International Financial Reporting Standards Foundation, the European Commission and the World Economic Forum’s International Business Council.</p> <p>Lots of names and acronyms in the above paragraph, but you get the idea: Finally, there is collaboration among the leading nongovernmental organizations focusing on sustainability reporting and accountability. To the extent they manage to harmonize their respective standards and frameworks, and should a future U.S. administration adopt those standards the way previous ones did the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles, we could see a rapid scale-up of corporate reporting on these matters.</p> <p>Increased reporting won’t by itself mitigate the anticipated macroeconomic challenges, but to the extent it puts climate risks on an equal footing with other corporate risks — along with a meaningful price on carbon that will help companies attach dollar signs to those risks — it will help advance a decarbonized economy.</p> <p>Slowly —?much too slowly —?but amid an unstable climate and economy we’ll take whatever progress we can get.</p> <p><em>I invite you to <a >follow me on Twitter</a>, subscribe to my Monday morning newsletter, <a href="http://www.deanhau.com/newsletters-subscribe">GreenBuzz</a>, and listen to <a href="http://www.deanhau.com/350">GreenBiz 350</a>, my weekly podcast, co-hosted with Heather Clancy.</em></p> </div> <div class="article__field-gbz-pull-quote"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Pull Quote </div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item">The financial climate, it seems, has been as unforgiving as the atmospheric one.</div> <div class="field__item">Finally, there is collaboration among the leading nongovernmental organizations focusing on sustainability reporting and accountability.</div> </div> </div> <div class="article__field-topics"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Topics </div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/finance-investing" hreflang="en">Finance & Investing</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/risk-resilience" hreflang="en">Risk & Resilience</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/policy-politics" hreflang="en">Policy & Politics</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/climate-change" hreflang="en">Climate Change</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="article__field-blog-featured"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Featured Column </div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/blogs/featured/two-steps-forward" hreflang="en">Two Steps Forward</a></div> </div> <div class="article__field-featured-in-featured-block"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) </div> <div class="field__item">On</div> </div> <div class="article__field-comments"><drupal-render-placeholder callback="Drupal\disqus\Element\Disqus::displayDisqusComments" arguments="0=How%20the%20climate%20crisis%20will%20crash%20the%20economy&1=https%3A//www.deanhau.com/article/how-climate-crisis-will-crash-economy&2=node/116406" token="PCxQAQbcHwJdwWLGmr7KQH87G8WOX3APTeS984lmWkE"></drupal-render-placeholder></div> <div class="article__field-duration"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Duration </div> <div class="field__item">0</div> </div> <div class="article__field-sponsored"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Sponsored Article </div> <div class="field__item">Off</div> </div> <div class="article__field-featured-image"><figure> <img src="http://www.deanhau.com/sites/default/files/2020-09/flatline.jpg" width="1900" height="1156" alt="Flatline" /> <div class="media-credit-wrapper"> <figcaption><p>Shutterstock</p> </figcaption> </div> </figure> </div> Mon, 14 Sep 2020 09:11:00 +0000 Joel Makower 116406 at http://www.deanhau.com Welcome to Circularity 20 http://www.deanhau.com/video/welcome-circularity-20 <span>Welcome to Circularity 20</span> <div class="gbz-video__body"><p>What will it take to accelerate the circular economy? Welcome to Circularity 20. The opening will set the stage for the virtual event, offer an overview of the program and ground attendees in what circularity means today.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="http://www.deanhau.com/user/34914">Holly Secon</a></span> <span>Fri, 09/11/2020 - 08:41</span> <div class="gbz-video__ref"><article> <div class="video-url__field-media-oembed-video"><iframe src="http://www.deanhau.com/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/24p3KOfeMQM&max_width=620&max_height=0&hash=oX4N4FhJKesN1N61WdpD49BbtmzBdhzPnm4O5hlPFbc" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="" width="620" height="200" class="media-oembed-content" title="Welcome to Circularity"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> <div class="gbz-video__field-featured-video"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Featured </div> <div class="field__item">Off</div> </div> Fri, 11 Sep 2020 15:41:56 +0000 Holly Secon 116350 at http://www.deanhau.com How to Design for the Future http://www.deanhau.com/video/how-design-future <span>How to Design for the Future</span> <div class="gbz-video__body"><p>How do we design for the future amid the disruptive present?</p> <p>In this closing plenary session, Lauren Phipps, director and senior analyst for the circular economy at GreenBiz, speaks with Tim Brown, CEO of IDEO, about how to design for the future.</p> <p>For example, how do you reconcile incremental change and the need to change more quickly to meet needs and goals? The COVID-19 pandemic has showed how quick change can happen. Now and in the future, organizations need to continue working together to develop better systems. ?</p> <p>"We need to move toward the future with energy and enthusiasm and not just fear," Brown says during the discussion.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="http://www.deanhau.com/user/34914">Holly Secon</a></span> <span>Wed, 09/09/2020 - 13:17</span> <div class="gbz-video__ref"><article> <div class="video-url__field-media-oembed-video"><iframe src="http://www.deanhau.com/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/H4DvL-YYz2U&max_width=620&max_height=0&hash=t93BoWy1ZRNSdNg_wRuqSDq08LHgtK3h7_83BrQ4j1M" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="" width="620" height="200" class="media-oembed-content" title="How to Design for the Future"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> <div class="gbz-video__field-featured-video"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Featured </div> <div class="field__item">Off</div> </div> Wed, 09 Sep 2020 20:17:00 +0000 Holly Secon 116378 at http://www.deanhau.com Circularity 20 Closing: Where do we go from here? http://www.deanhau.com/video/circularity-20-closing-where-do-we-go-here <span>Circularity 20 Closing: Where do we go from here?</span> <div class="gbz-video__body"><p>?</p> <p>Lauren Phipps, Director & Senior Analyst of the Circular Economy at GreenBiz Group, discusses what's next in her closing thoughts.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="http://www.deanhau.com/user/34914">Holly Secon</a></span> <span>Mon, 09/07/2020 - 11:42</span> <div class="gbz-video__ref"><article> <div class="video-url__field-media-oembed-video"><iframe src="http://www.deanhau.com/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/BSsgosoIbAM&max_width=620&max_height=0&hash=-xSPD1PphQUvlFqPJqXUm_LgGAqz1iXspvv0O3BmbfA" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="" width="620" height="200" class="media-oembed-content" title="Circularity 20 Closing: Where do we go from here?"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> <div class="gbz-video__field-featured-video"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Featured </div> <div class="field__item">Off</div> </div> Mon, 07 Sep 2020 18:42:13 +0000 Holly Secon 116373 at http://www.deanhau.com Episode 258: Hacking climate solutions, finding 'good work' http://www.deanhau.com/article/episode-258-hacking-climate-solutions-finding-good-work <span>Episode 258: Hacking climate solutions, finding 'good work'</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="http://www.deanhau.com/heather-clancy">Heather Clancy</a></span> <span>Fri, 03/05/2021 - 02:00</span> <div class="article__body"><h3>Week in Review</h3> <p><em>Stories discussed this week (5:05).</em></p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/article/just-energy-transition-action-developing-1g-wind-power-tribes">A just energy transition in action: Developing 1G of wind power with tribes</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/article/role-time-horizons-and-relationship-banking-financing-net-zero-economy">The role of time horizons and relationship banking in financing a net-zero economy</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/article/coming-net-zero-backlash">The coming net-zero backlash</a></li> </ul> <h3>Features</h3> <p><strong>Hacking the climate crisis (21:10)</strong></p> <p><a >Sanjana Paul</a>, a 23-year-old scientist, electrical engineer and environmental activist, is executive director of EarthHacks, a hackathon that encourages college students to surface solutions for combating climate change. She talks about her mission with Shana Rappaport, GreenBiz vice president and executive director of the VERGE conference series.?</p> <p><strong>Is your job meaningful? (32:40)</strong></p> <p>Career coach and long-time GreenBiz columnist Shannon Houde chats with Associate Editor Deonna Anderson about her new book, "<a >Good Work: How to Build a Career That Makes A Difference in the World</a>."</p> <p><strong>*Music in this episode by Lee Rosevere</strong>: "As I Was Saying," "Sad Marimba Planet," "Southside" and "More On That Later"</p> <h3>Stay connected</h3> <p>To make sure you don't miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on <a >iTunes</a> or <a >Spotify</a>. Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? E-mail us at <a href="mailto:350@greenbiz.com">350@greenbiz.com</a>.</p> </div> <div class="article__field-contributors"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Contributors </div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/joel-makower" hreflang="en">Joel Makower</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="article__field-topics"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Topics </div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/podcast" hreflang="en">Podcast</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/social-justice" hreflang="en">Social Justice</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/renewable-energy" hreflang="en">Renewable Energy</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/careers" hreflang="en">Careers</a></div> </div> </div> <a href="http://www.deanhau.com/tag/net-zero" class="badge badge-light"> Net-Zero </a> <div class="article__field-blog-enterprise"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Collective Insight </div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/blogs/enterprise/greenbiz-350-podcast" hreflang="en">GreenBiz 350 Podcast</a></div> </div> <div class="article__field-multimedia"><audio controls="controls"> <source src="http://www.deanhau.com/sites/default/files/media/episode_258.mp3" type="audio/mpeg"></source> </audio> </div> <div class="article__field-featured-in-featured-block"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) </div> <div class="field__item">Off</div> </div> <div class="article__field-comments"><drupal-render-placeholder callback="Drupal\disqus\Element\Disqus::displayDisqusComments" arguments="0=Episode%20258%3A%20Hacking%20climate%20solutions%2C%20finding%20%27good%20work%27&1=https%3A//www.deanhau.com/article/episode-258-hacking-climate-solutions-finding-good-work&2=node/117354" token="fwL8U1957M0VBQnVSubNi-irxbqDMqflMB0JhreKjcs"></drupal-render-placeholder></div> <div class="article__field-duration"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Duration </div> <div class="field__item">51:41</div> </div> <div class="article__field-sponsored"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Sponsored Article </div> <div class="field__item">Off</div> </div> <div class="article__field-featured-image"><figure> <img src="http://www.deanhau.com/sites/default/files/images/articles/featured/cms_podcast_image_0.png" width="1470" height="894" /> <div class="media-credit-wrapper"> <button type="button" class="media-credit-btn"> </button> <div class="media-authorship-wrapper"> <div class="image__field-gbz-media-authorship">GreenBiz</div> <button type="button" class="media-close-btn"> Close Authorship </button> </div> </div> </figure> </div> Fri, 05 Mar 2021 10:00:00 +0000 Heather Clancy 117354 at http://www.deanhau.com Q1 2021: Food waste; the secret of fat; keep it local http://www.deanhau.com/article/q1-2021-food-waste-secret-fat-keep-it-local <span>Q1 2021: Food waste; the secret of fat; keep it local</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="http://www.deanhau.com/jim-giles">Jim Giles</a></span> <span>Fri, 03/05/2021 - 01:00</span> <div class="article__body"><p><em>Want more great analysis of sustainable food systems? Sign up for?<a href="http://www.deanhau.com/subscribe-food-weekly">Food Weekly</a>, our free email newsletter.</em></p> <p>I wrote recently about the <a href="http://www.deanhau.com/article/how-climate-crisis-accelerating-food-systems-reform">intense level of innovation</a> we’re seeing in food and ag. To try to stay on top of things, I’ll run quarterly roundups that highlight startups with the potential to move the needle on sustainability. I’ll focus on early-stage companies but will drop in some larger outfits. Here’s my first-quarter?selection:</p> <h3>Keep it local</h3> <p>Singapore-based Sophie’s Bionutrients uses fermentation to power a circular economy process that <a >transforms industrial food waste</a> from breweries, tofu manufacturers and other facilities into a protein flour that can be used as an ingredient in other food products.?</p> <p>The company jumped out at me because its tech ties in with Singapore’s bid to meet <a >30 percent of its inhabitants’ nutritional needs using local food by 2030</a> — a threefold increase on current local supply. Local food supply is increasingly seen as adding resilience to food systems, and it’ll be fascinating to see what the rest of the world can learn from Singapore’s progress. Because the company is reusing what was previously seen as waste, Sophie’s is also a great example of tech that can help food systems transition from extractive to circular.?</p> <p><em>Learn more: The Platform for Accelerating the Circular Economy recently released a detailed <a >Action Agenda for Food</a>.</em></p> <h3>Fat lab</h3> <p>"Fat is the secret ingredient that defines how meat looks, cooks and tastes," said Max Jamilly, co-founder of <strong>Hoxton Farms, </strong>a startup aiming to grow animal fat in the lab.</p> <p>Leading alt-protein offerings — the burgers from Impossible Foods and Beyond Meat, for instance — contain plant fats that lack the meaty taste of the real thing. Hoxton’s big idea is to <a >grow animal fat from animal cells</a>, which would avoid the need to rear and slaughter actual animals.</p> <p>It’s early days for the company, which last month raised a $2.7 million seed round. But the startup is symbolic of the increasing specialization of the alt-protein sector. Incumbents such as Impossible developed much or all of their technology, but a new generation of startups is focusing on specific solutions such as bioreactor technologies, 3D printers and low-cost alternatives to the serums used to grow animal cells.?</p> <p><em>Learn more: The Good Food Institute has a <a >comprehensive database</a> of companies in this sector.</em></p> <h3>Circular sugar</h3> <p>Sugar production drives a host of environmental problems, from biodiversity loss to water scarcity. That damage, together with the health impacts of eating too much sugar, has triggered a rush to find alternatives that are better for our bodies and our planet. One approach is to cut back on the amount we eat by making conventional sugars taste sweeter. At <strong>Supplant</strong>, engineers have another goal: figuring out how to extract sugar from fibrous material that otherwise would be treated as waste. The company recently <a >announced a $20 million round</a> and said it will launch its first product in collaboration with a big-name — although as yet unnamed — chef.</p> <p><em>Learn more: The New Yorker recently ran a fascinating feature on "<a >The race to redesign sugar</a>."</em></p> <h3>Sticking it to waste?</h3> <p>There’s a hard-to-maintain balancing act at the heart of attempts to limit food waste. Consumers like to have plenty of food on hand at home and in stores. The obvious solution is to over-order, but that’s one reason why those locations account for half of all food waste in the United States.</p> <p>There’s no silver bullet here, but extending the shelf life of fruits and vegetables could help. Apeel is a well-known market leader in this area: Its <a >freshness-extending coating</a> is used on avocados in Kroger stores and other outlets. <strong>StixFresh</strong> is a newer entrant with a rival solution: Its stickers contain compounds that delay the ripening of apples, pears, avocados, dragon fruits, kiwis, mangoes, oranges and other citrus fruits.</p> <p>One interesting differentiation between <a >StixFresh and other solutions</a> is that the stickers can be easily applied at home. The company was one of 17 named last month to the inaugural cohort of the <a >Circulars Accelerator</a>, a circular economy incubator run by Accenture in partnership with the World Economic Forum and others.</p> <p><em>Learn more: ReFED’s <a >Insights Engine</a> contains a wealth of information on the causes of and cures for food waste.</em></p> <h4>Pick of the bunch</h4> <p>As costs come down, next-gen greenhouses and vertical farms may be able to expand beyond their existing niche, which is mainly in leafy greens. And as these operations plug into an electricity grid that’s steadily decarbonizing, they may be able to deliver on the <a href="http://www.deanhau.com/article/decarbonization-promise-indoor-agriculture-still-seed-stage">full sustainability potential of indoor ag</a>.</p> <p>To further drive down costs, a handful of startups are competing to replace human pickers with robots. One?— <strong>Root AI</strong> — caught my eye because it’s on a <a >hiring spree</a>; the result, presumably, of having <a >closed a $7 million round last year</a>.?</p> <p>It will be interesting to see how this technology changes the economics of indoor ag and which commercial crops migrate into greenhouses and vertical farms as a result. We also need a better understanding of the impact of these advances on the groups, particularly immigrants, that rely on income from farm labor.</p> <p>Learn more: The World Wildlife Fund is investigating how to build an indoor farming industry that <a >meets the needs of local people and the environment</a>.?</p> <p><em>That’s it for my Q1 roundup. If you work for or know of a startup that should get a mention in Q2, shoot me an email at <a href="mailto:jg@greenbiz.com">jg@greenbiz.com</a>.</em></p> </div> <div class="article__field-topics"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Topics </div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/food-agriculture" hreflang="en">Food & Agriculture</a></div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/food-systems" hreflang="en">Food Systems</a></div> </div> </div> <a href="http://www.deanhau.com/tag/food-waste" class="badge badge-light"> Food Waste </a> <div class="article__field-blog-enterprise"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Collective Insight </div> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/blogs/enterprise/food-system-startups" hreflang="en">Food System Startups</a></div> </div> <div class="article__field-featured-in-featured-block"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) </div> <div class="field__item">Off</div> </div> <div class="article__field-comments"><drupal-render-placeholder callback="Drupal\disqus\Element\Disqus::displayDisqusComments" arguments="0=Q1%202021%3A%20Food%20waste%3B%20the%20secret%20of%20fat%3B%20keep%20it%20local&1=https%3A//www.deanhau.com/article/q1-2021-food-waste-secret-fat-keep-it-local&2=node/117352" token="sD1O3vSc5v8Ei-T6SS3ThBP5wHubXKFKctzKehHe-RQ"></drupal-render-placeholder></div> <div class="article__field-duration"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Duration </div> <div class="field__item">0</div> </div> <div class="article__field-sponsored"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Sponsored Article </div> <div class="field__item">Off</div> </div> <div class="article__field-featured-image"><figure> <img src="http://www.deanhau.com/sites/default/files/2021-03/food_sstock.jpg" width="2808" height="1872" alt="Vegetables presented in bowls" /> <div class="media-credit-wrapper"> <button type="button" class="media-credit-btn"> <div class="image__field-gbz-media-source">Shutterstock</div> </button> <div class="media-authorship-wrapper"> <div class="image__field-gbz-media-authorship">Marilyn Barbone</div> <button type="button" class="media-close-btn"> Close Authorship </button> </div> </div> </figure> </div> Fri, 05 Mar 2021 09:00:00 +0000 Jim Giles 117352 at http://www.deanhau.com 5 opportunities of a circular economy http://www.deanhau.com/article/5-opportunities-circular-economy <span>5 opportunities of a circular economy</span> <span><a title="View user profile." href="http://www.deanhau.com/david-mcginty">David McGinty</a></span> <span>Fri, 03/05/2021 - 00:12</span> <div class="article__body"><p>More than 100 billion tons of resources enter the economy every year — everything from metals, minerals and fossil fuels to organic materials from plants and animals. Just <a >8.6 percent</a> gets recycled and used again. Use of resources has <a >tripled</a> (automatic PDF download) since 1970 and could double again by 2050 if business continues as usual. We would need <a >1.5 Earths</a> to sustainably support our current resource use.</p> <p>This rampant consumption has devastating effects for humans, wildlife and the planet. It is more urgent than ever to shift from linear, use-it-up-and-throw-it-away models to a circular economy: where waste and pollution are designed out, products and materials are kept in use for longer, and natural systems can regenerate.</p> <p>A circular economy isn’t just about fixing environmental wrongs, though: Evidence shows it can bring big opportunities and positive impacts across industries, sectors and lives.</p> <p>A growing number of businesses, governments and civil society organizations are coming together to drive the change through the <a >Platform for Accelerating the Circular Economy (PACE)</a>. More than 200 experts from 100 organizations helped develop the <a >Circular Economy Action Agenda</a>, a set of publications that analyze the potential impact and call for action across five key sectors: plastics, textiles, electronics, food and capital equipment (machinery and large tools such as medical scanners, agricultural equipment and manufacturing infrastructure). The Action Agenda demonstrates five opportunities associated with the shift to a circular economy:</p> <h3>1.?Make better use of finite resources</h3> <p>The circular economy concept is all about making better use of natural resources such as forests, soil, water, air, metals and minerals.</p> <p>Take the textiles industry. Each year, huge quantities of fossil fuels are used to produce clothes from synthetic fibers each year. Textile production (including cotton farming) uses almost <a >100 billion cubic meters</a> of water per year, about 4 percent of global freshwater withdrawal. At the same time, people throw away still-wearable clothes worth an estimated $460 billion each year.</p> <p>Creating a circular economy for textiles means shifting to recycled and recyclable materials in order to reduce the amount of land, water and fossil fuels used to produce new clothes. It means changing consumption patterns to reduce new purchases and keep clothes in use for longer, for instance by developing the second-hand and rental markets as well as changing the culture of fast fashion. Research suggests that the purchase of <a >100 second-hand garments</a> can displace the production of 85 new garments. And finally, it means ensuring that clothes at the end of their life are collected and recycled or repurposed into new clothes, further reducing resource use.</p> <h3>2. Reduce emissions</h3> <p>About 45 percent of global greenhouse gas emissions come from product use and manufacturing, as well as food production. Circular economy strategies that reduce our use of resources can cut global greenhouse gas emissions by <a >39 percent</a> (22.8 billion tons) and play a crucial role in averting the dangerous impacts of climate change.</p> <p>For example, shifting towards recycled materials would alleviate the need to produce virgin plastics and synthetic fibers, which would significantly reduce fossil fuel use and associated emissions. Changing consumption patterns is also crucial: For example, if the average number of times a garment is worn were doubled, greenhouse gas emissions from the textiles industry would be 44 percent lower.</p> <p></p><blockquote class="blockquote-large"> <div class="blockquote-large__inner">The world produces around?300 million tons?of plastic waste every year, nearly equivalent to the weight of the entire human population.</div> </blockquote> <p>Creating a circular economy for food by reducing loss and waste is particularly crucial to lowering emissions: If food loss and waste were a country, it would be the <a >third-largest emitter</a> after the United States and China.</p> <h3>3. Protect human health and biodiversity</h3> <p>Every year, more than <a >9 million deaths</a> occur due to air, water and soil pollution. This pollution also <a >threatens biodiversity</a>.</p> <p>Working towards a circular economy helps protect human health and biodiversity in many ways, including by making better use of natural resources (protecting water and land), and by mitigating the climate crisis. One of the clearest and most direct impacts of the shift to a circular economy will come from how we deal with products at the end of their life.</p> <p>The world produces around <a >300 million tons</a> of plastic waste every year, nearly equivalent to the weight of the entire human population. This is on top of <a >54 million tons of electronic waste (e-waste), of which just 17.4 percent</a> gets collected and recycled. This waste becomes hazardous for human health and for biodiversity when it is mismanaged, either leaking into the natural environment or disposed of through open burning, landfills or substandard recycling.</p> <p>Designing products to be kept in use for longer reduces the amount of waste produced. Creating proper collection and processing systems protects workers and the environment from hazardous materials. For instance, using existing solutions such as replacing plastic other materials, designing plastics so that they can be more easily recycled and scaling up collection and recycling could reduce the flow of plastic waste into the ocean <a >by 80 percent</a> in 20 years — a shift that would be enormously beneficial for human health and biodiversity.</p> <h3>4. Boost economies</h3> <p>Research shows that the circular economy offers a <a >$4.5 trillion economic opportunity </a>by reducing waste, stimulating innovation and creating employment. New business models focused on <a >reuse, repair,</a> remanufacturing and sharing models offer significant innovation opportunities.</p> <p>For example, a circular economy for plastics offers considerable economic benefits. Less plastic waste in the ocean would benefit industries such as fishing and tourism, as plastic pollution leads to <a >$13 billion</a> in costs and economic losses per year. Reducing the pollution and toxic emissions that come from the open burning of plastic waste would lower healthcare costs, while reducing fossil fuel use for plastic production would help mitigate climate change and its associated costs.</p> <p>Many of these economic benefits and opportunities are long-term, indirect and require significant investment; a long-term view is key, as are short-term incentives to drive the change. This can include policies that create more immediate financial incentives for businesses to develop <a >innovative new business models</a> and enable the efficient flow of reused and recycled materials across global value chains.</p> <h3>5. Create more and better jobs</h3> <p>Transitioning to a circular economy could create a net increase of <a >6 million jobs by 2030</a>. Making the most of this opportunity will require a clear focus on social and environmental justice.</p> <p>Jobs may be lost in more linear businesses; however, new jobs will be created in fields such as recycling, services such as repair and rental, or in new enterprises that spring up to make innovative use of secondary materials. These new jobs cannot be considered direct replacements, as they may be in different locations and require different skills. For instance, we must consider the millions of garment workers — mostly women — whose employment depends on the continuation of the fast fashion industry. Investing in a <a >just transition</a> via social dialogue, social protection and reskilling programs is key.</p> <p>While a net increase in jobs is important, another value-add of circularity is the opportunity to provide formal work and improved working conditions for informal laborers. Around 15 million people worldwide work as "waste pickers," salvaging reusable or recyclable materials from garbage. Bringing these informal waste pickers into formal work in collection or recycling is a major opportunity to offer safer, more secure employment.</p> <h3>Maximizing the impact of the circular economy</h3> <p>Of course, there are always trade-offs to be considered and managed when working towards large-scale, systemic change. For example, shifting to bio-based plastics and natural, recyclable textiles such as cotton will use less fossil fuels than traditional plastics or synthetic fibers, but may increase demands for land and water to grow such materials. Shifting to natural materials is a crucial part of the solution, but only if those materials are produced in a sustainable way — and only if consumption habits change, too.</p> <p></p><blockquote class="blockquote-large"> <div class="blockquote-large__inner">A long-term view is key, as are short-term incentives to drive the change.</div> </blockquote> <p>It’s also important to recognize the interconnected nature of the global economy. Many minerals and metals used in electronics are byproducts from the mining of aluminum, copper, lead and zinc, which are used across industries. Going circular in the electronics industry alone?would not do much to reduce dependence on these resources. Multiple industries must shift to create systemic change.</p> <p>Finally, it will be crucial to keep social well-being and equity top-of-mind. For example, moving to a circular economy can shift investment and employment away from production and manufacturing (which tends to happen in lower-income countries) and towards later stages of the value chain, such as repair, resale, sorting and recycling (often concentrated in wealthier countries). We’ll need to ensure that economic benefits are <a >equitably distributed</a> to maximize the opportunity of a circular economy.</p> <h3>A role for everyone</h3> <p>The above five impact areas exhibit some of the social, environmental and economic benefits of a circular economy, but realizing these benefits will require ambitious action. Governments, businesses, civil society, finance institutions, research organizations — everyone has a role to play. The new Circular Economy Action Agenda is a good place to start.</p> </div> <div class="article__field-gbz-pull-quote"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Pull Quote </div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item">The world produces around?300 million tons?of plastic waste every year, nearly equivalent to the weight of the entire human population.</div> <div class="field__item">A long-term view is key, as are short-term incentives to drive the change.</div> </div> </div> <div class="article__field-topics"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Topics </div> <div class="field__items"> <div class="field__item"><a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/circular-economy" hreflang="en">Circular Economy</a></div> </div> </div> <div class="article__source"><a >WRI</a></div> <div class="article__field-featured-in-featured-block"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Featured in featured block (1 article with image touted on the front page or elsewhere) </div> <div class="field__item">Off</div> </div> <div class="article__field-comments"><drupal-render-placeholder callback="Drupal\disqus\Element\Disqus::displayDisqusComments" arguments="0=5%20opportunities%20of%20a%20circular%20economy&1=https%3A//www.deanhau.com/article/5-opportunities-circular-economy&2=node/117342" token="kmMiCQ9pNBXtSLUBkd8Qob5AsG4jPum6trDqwRulKlE"></drupal-render-placeholder></div> <div class="article__field-duration"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Duration </div> <div class="field__item">0</div> </div> <div class="article__field-sponsored"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Sponsored Article </div> <div class="field__item">Off</div> </div> <div class="article__field-featured-image"><figure> <img src="http://www.deanhau.com/sites/default/files/2021-03/circularleaves_Hyper%20Story_sstock.jpg" width="1470" height="894" alt="Treating finite resources wisely is part of the picture." /> <div class="media-credit-wrapper"> <figcaption><p>Treating finite resources wisely is part of the picture.</p> </figcaption> <button type="button" class="media-credit-btn"> <div class="image__field-gbz-media-source">Shutterstock</div> </button> <div class="media-authorship-wrapper"> <div class="image__field-gbz-media-authorship">Hyper Story</div> <button type="button" class="media-close-btn"> Close Authorship </button> </div> </div> </figure> </div> Fri, 05 Mar 2021 08:12:12 +0000 David McGinty 117342 at http://www.deanhau.com Alpa Sutaria on how Coca-Cola is addressing issues associated with plastic waste http://www.deanhau.com/video/alpa-sutaria-how-coca-cola-addressing-issues-associated-plastic-waste <span>Alpa Sutaria on how Coca-Cola is addressing issues associated with plastic waste </span> <div class="gbz-video__body"><p>This video is sponsored by Coca-Cola.</p> <p>Pete May, President and Co-Founder, GreenBiz Group interviewed Alpa Sutaria, Vice President and General Manager, Sustainability, Coca-Cola during GreenBiz 21 on February 9-11th. View archived videos from the conference here: <a href="http://www.deanhau.com/topics/greenbiz-21-archive">http://www.deanhau.com/topics/greenbiz-21-archive</a>.</p> </div> <span><a title="View user profile." href="http://www.deanhau.com/yanni-guo">YanniGuo</a></span> <span>Thu, 03/04/2021 - 13:28</span> <div class="gbz-video__ref"><article> <div class="video-url__field-media-oembed-video"><iframe src="http://www.deanhau.com/media/oembed?url=https%3A//youtu.be/mXXDR-q7B4k&max_width=620&max_height=0&hash=x3hiYWg_NEuWHSLke1dtZmm5ySs7qXj4UO0Y4K7sfYg" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="" width="620" height="200" class="media-oembed-content" title="Alpa Sutaria on how Coca-Cola is addressing issues associated with plastic waste"></iframe> </div> </article> </div> <div class="gbz-video__field-featured-video"> <div class="field__label font-weight-bold"> Featured </div> <div class="field__item">Off</div> </div> Thu, 04 Mar 2021 21:28:43 +0000 YanniGuo 117366 at http://www.deanhau.com 印度女人牲交视频免费播放_学生毛都没有在线播放_大屁股大乳丰满人妻